Do you use a torque wrench?

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Zombie Master
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Do you use a torque wrench?

Post by Zombie Master » Thu Dec 21, 2017 7:16 pm

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SteveD
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Re: Do you use a torque wrench?

Post by SteveD » Fri Dec 22, 2017 4:51 am

Yup, mostly on brakes, engine and drain plugs. I did a similar "test" ;) myself years back on a final drive filler plug.
I stripped it so broke their results by over torquing it. :x Lesson learned. :oops:
Cheers, Steve
Victoria, S.E.Oz.


1982 R100RSR100RS supergallery. https://boxerboy81.smugmug.com/
2006 K1200R.

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jagarra
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Re: Do you use a torque wrench?

Post by jagarra » Fri Dec 22, 2017 6:30 pm

I very rarely use a torque wrench, did recently to see how tight the bolts needed to be on my R1100RS. I figure if you use the correct size wrench (length wise) on an item you can feel when it's tight. Just like the rear wheel bolts on this 1100, if you use the supplied wrench and extension piece you can only get it so tight.
1974 R90/6 built 9/73
1994 BMW R1100RS
1964 T100SR Triumph
1986 Kawasaki Concours

Wobbly
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Re: Do you use a torque wrench?

Post by Wobbly » Wed Dec 27, 2017 4:54 pm

The rear wheel flange IS a bad design. They should never have used countersunk fasteners against cast aluminum... even if it does center the wheel nicely.

Yes I use several torque wrenches.
After 20 years as a professional bike mechanic and 30 years as an engineer I know just enough to be dangerous !

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ME 109
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Re: Do you use a torque wrench?

Post by ME 109 » Wed Dec 27, 2017 8:30 pm

I use a torque wrench where it matters. Conrod bolts, tranny output flange nut, cylinder studs. That's about it, so far.
I have two main torque wrenches with the target torques being in the middle 50% of the wrenches range.
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Airbear
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Re: Do you use a torque wrench?

Post by Airbear » Thu Dec 28, 2017 12:08 am

^^^ Much the same for me. I have a midrange chinese clicky torque wrench and have access to some others but there are very few things that I bother to measure.

A digression: Back in the 70s when I was fooling around with VWs I couldn't afford a torque wrench so I made one for torquing the head studs. I used a tube spanner (wrench), a length of threaded rod and a spring scale of the sort fisherfolk used back then. I checked the accuracy of the spring scale using a plastic bucket and a measured volume of water - it was surprisingly accurate in the range I wanted. With the threaded rod bolted through the holes in the tube spanner and the hook of the spring balance 12 inches from the centre I could pull on the spring scale and read off foot pounds.
Charlie
and Brunhilde - 1974 R90/6
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jagarra
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Re: Do you use a torque wrench?

Post by jagarra » Thu Dec 28, 2017 9:29 am

Like Jeff, I use the torque wrench when it matters and I feel that a precise amount of measurement is required. Many of us have been turning wrenches since were took our cribs apart. We have made the mistakes of stripping out and breaking bolts and have learned that "feel" when it is tight enough.
BMW has a torque setting for probably every fastner and plug on the machine. One has to realize that in a factory environment assembly points have preset tools that apply the correct amount of torque for every fastener they touch. For us home mechanics with common hand tools experience is gained by making mistakes and knowing what not to do again.
Just like Duane says in his adjustment of the preload on the front wheel bearings, you have to tighten the axle nut with the correct length wrench in order not to over torque it and affect the preload adjustment.
1974 R90/6 built 9/73
1994 BMW R1100RS
1964 T100SR Triumph
1986 Kawasaki Concours

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